Control Feline Osteoarthritis Pain

Solensia is the feline OA pain control therapy designed with the practice, the client, and the cat in mind.

OA IN CATS

The Prevalence of Feline Osteoarthritis

Feline OA is highly prevalent, but it can be difficult to diagnose cats when they don’t visit.

Nearly 40% of all cats have clinical signs of OA 1

% Feline Patient Visits by Age2

feline patient visits feline patient visits feline patient visits
cat 6 years cat 6 years cat 6 years

60% of cats >6 years of age are affected by OA3

cat 12 years cat 12 years cat 12 years

90% of cats >12 years of age are affected by OA4

Learning about OA pain motivates pet owners to see their veterinarian.

Cat Owners Cat Owners Cat Owners

>50%

of cat owners who recognized OA pain signs in their cat were motivated to make an appointment with their veterinarian6

MULTIMODAL THERAPY

Analgesia Is Foundational to a Multimodal OA Treatment Approach

Pain is the primary experience and treatable sign of OA

It is a multidimensional & uniquely individual experience

Pain becomes its own disease state when left untreated

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Goals for Managing Feline OA

  • Controlling pain
  • Maintaining mobility
  • Slowing the progression of the disease

But multimodal treatment can come with an unintended cost: Caregiver

TREATMENT FOR OA

Treat Cats Monthly With Solensia

Providing early, effective treatment designed for long-term OA pain management is the goal. Solensia helps keep OA pain from disrupting the unique bond cats share with their humans.

How Solensia treats cats:

Monoclonal Antibody

A monoclonal antibody that is metabolized the same as all proteins

Target NGF

Targets NGF, a key driver in OA pain progression

Monthly Injection

Administered by the veterinarian clinic as a monthly injection

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Get notified when Solensia is available

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View tips forexamining cats for OA

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Find resources to screen for OA pain

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Get an OA checklist for your clients

References

  1. Enomoto M, Mantyh PW, Murrell J, Innes JF, Lascelles BDX. Anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibodies for the control of pain in dogs and cats. Vet Rec. 2019;184(1):23.
  2. Zoetis Market Research: Feline Visit Growth Age MAT. September 2019.
  3. Slingerland L, Hazewinkel H, Meij B, Picavet P, Voorhout G. Cross-sectional study of the prevalence and clinical features of osteoarthritis in 100 cats. Vet J. 2011;187:304-309.
  4.  Hardie EM, Roe SC, Martin FR: Radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease in geriatric cats: 100 cases (1994–1997). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2002;220:628-632.
  5.  Lascelles BDX, Brown DC, Conzemius MG, Gill M, Oshinksy ML, Sharkey M. Measurement of chronic pain in companion animals: discussions from the Pain in Animals Workshop (PAW) 2017. Vet J. 2019;250(8):71-78.
  6.  Data on File, November Pet Owner 2018 KG Marketsense, Zoetis Inc.

SLN-00004

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION:

See full Prescribing Information. For use in cats only. Women who are pregnant, trying to conceive or breastfeeding should take extreme care to avoid self-injection. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, could potentially occur with self-injection. Solensia should not be used in breeding cats or in pregnant or lactating queens. Solensia should not be administered to cats with known hypersensitivity to frunevetmab. The most common adverse events reported in a clinical study were vomiting and injection site pain.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION:

See full Prescribing Information. For use in cats only. Women who are pregnant, trying to conceive or breastfeeding should take extreme care to avoid self-injection. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, could potentially occur with self-injection. Solensia should not be used in breeding cats or in pregnant or lactating queens. Solensia should not be administered to cats with known hypersensitivity to frunevetmab. The most common adverse events reported in a clinical study were vomiting and injection site pain.